• What Happens to The Immune System During Pregnancy?

    Your immune system has one basic function: to keep you healthy. By using a complex array of biological tools and weapons, your body can fend off most invaders, including viruses, bacteria, and the occasional fungus. 

    But pregnancy introduces some additional complexity for all those t-cells and antibodies (not to mention the scientists and doctors that study them). Your immune response to something like a cold or flu may be different when you’re pregnant than you would normally expect. So knowing more about typical pregnancy immune system responses can help you better plan for your nine month term.

    After all, keeping your immune system in tip top shape is a way to keep you and your baby healthy. 

     

    An Evolving Understanding of Your Pregnancy Immune System

    Scientists used to think that women’s immune systems became weaker as pregnancy progressed. To these researchers, it seemed logical to think about the fetus as a kind of transplanted organ. 

    When an organ recipient gets a new liver or lung or heart, the patient must take immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of their life. This stops the immune system from seeing the transplanted organ as a threat and initiating an immune response (a process known as rejection). A fetus must require the same kind of protection, researchers thought, which meant that immunity during pregnancy must be diminished.

     

    Relying on Your Immune Response

    But new research suggests that this is not what happens when you become pregnant. At least, not exactly. 

    Modern scientists and researchers have observed that the interaction between your pregnancy and your immune system is much more complicated than first suspected–in many ways, it’s a kind of complex dance. 

    This dance between your body, your baby, and your immune system continues throughout your pregnancy. And there are certain aspects of your immune response that actually become stronger when you’re pregnant. For example, we now know that implantation of the embryo in the uterine wall cannot happen without a strong immune system reaction. That immune response causes inflammation in the uterine lining (the same type of inflammation that results from an injury) which is essential to successful implantation.

     

    Will You Feel Sicker?

    Further research has reinforced the notion of a particular strong immune system for pregnancy women, suggesting that the initial 15 weeks of pregnancy depend on a potent immune response. 

    Some studies have even shown that the presence of various types of T-cells increase while you’re pregnant. These T-cells (or white blood cells) are responsible for a few different aspects of your immunology. Regulatory T-cells (or Tregs) and so-called killer T-cells are just two types–and during pregnancy your body promotes and amplifies production of each.

    During the course of your pregnancy, your body’s immune system will work hard to protect both you and your baby. But that doesn’t always necessarily work in your favor symptomatically. Scientists have known for some time that ailments such as the common cold or influenza tends to hit pregnant women harder than non-pregnant women. 

    The assumption always used to be that this was because pregnant women’s immune systems were weaker (again, working on that organ transplant-like situation). The reality, however, is that colds and flus tend to be more severe in women because their immune systems are more powerful–the more severe symptoms are due to an overly strong inflammatory response. 

     

    Practical Tips to Keep You Healthy

    So you can see why knowing more about how the immune system operates while you’re pregnant can be important information. Researchers are still looking into exactly what happens when–and to a certain extent, much of this information is interesting… but mom’s-to-be are want to know about practical steps they can take.

    Whether you’re pregnant or not (but especially if you’re pregnant) it’s important to do all you can to keep your immune system functioning optimally. There are a couple of ways you can do this:

    It should be noted that your body’s immune system will take some time to return to normal after the birth of your baby. In other words, the roller coaster doesn’t end with delivery! Your OBGYN may monitor your hormone levels and blood work to make sure everything gets back to where it should be.

     

    What About Non Normal Immune Responses?

    There are a couple of reasons you may want to talk to your OBGYN about your immune system while you’re pregnant. Everyone’s pregnancy immune system, after all, will very much depend on how your typical immune system behaves. So you should talk to your OBGYN if you:

    Each of these conditions can complicate your immune response while you’re pregnant. But speaking with an OBGYN can help you plan for those challenges and develop workable and practical solutions. 

    When you get sick, your baby gets sick, too. So, in a very real way, your immune system is protecting both you and your baby. Your OBGYN’s goal will be to get your immune response–all those white blood cells–working as normally as possible. 

     

    Keeping an Eye on Your Immune System

    Researchers and doctors are still developing diagnostic criteria to make it easier to detect normal and abnormal immune responses. What’s important for most mothers, however, is that you get your sleep, take your vitamins and minerals, and stay active–keeping your immune system as healthy as possible. 

    If you have questions about your immune system during pregnancy, contact our Wilmette or Glenview offices to make an appointment!

     

    NSAGO News

    As many of you know Dr. Jean Ruth is leaving NSAGO to make a new beginning in the great Pacific Northwest – she and her family will move to Spokane, Washington later this month.  She has been with us for 3 ½ years and has done an incredible job working with our providers, staff, and especially, the growing patient base she has served. The patient feedback we have received, both in person and with her on-line reviews inform us that she is truly a special doctor. We will all miss Jean and wish her all the best.

     

    E Perelman MD NSAGOThe rest of the NSAGO family will continue to accommodate and care for Dr. Ruth’s patients. Dr. Liz Perelman joined us last year and has become an integral team member and excellent care provider for our patients.  She is available to see patients at our Wilmette and Glenview locations. Likewise Drs. Goodwin, Johnson and Saleh are happy to see patients for ongoing pregnancy care and gynecology visits. New patients are also welcome so feel free to refer friends and relatives.

     

    We are also very happy to welcome Imaan Ansari, MD, who will join NSAGO in August. Dr. Ansari grew up in the south suburbs of Chicago and graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. She attended the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and then returned to Chicago for Ob-Gyn residency training at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center. We have been very happy to get to know Imaan as a kind and talented physician with superb credentials and a work ethic to match. She will assume Dr. Ruth’s schedule and will have hours in Wilmette and Glenview.

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